Tech Advice

Adelaide Techguy On Today Tonight – 1st May

I was on Today Tonight discussing mobile phone repeaters.


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About The Repeaters

Mobile repeater devices are designed to replicate and improve mobile signal. Telstra regularly use these devices in their network, however when used without appropriate licences and technical specifications they can interfere with mobile coverage in surrounding areas.

The illegal use of these devices can cause significant mobile coverage issues for local communities, and has even been known to knock out coverage to an entire area.

Can I operate a mobile phone repeater?

You can only operate a mobile phone repeater if you have been authorised by a carrier.

A person must not operate or possess (for the purpose of operation) a radiocommunications device, unless that person is authorised under either a spectrum, apparatus or class licence. 

A mobile phone repeater operates within apparatus or spectrum licensed radiofrequency bands-licensed to mobile phone carriers. As such, to operate this device, you will require carrier permission under a third party arrangement.

It is illegal to operate a repeater without carrier permission because this device has the capacity to cause substantial interference to the mobile network. This can occur because the device is not coordinated with other radiocommunications infrastructure in the mobile network.

It is an offence under the Radiocommunications Act 1992 (the Act) to operate an unlicensed radiocommunications device, or possess this device for the purpose of operation. A person found guilty of this offence may be imprisoned for two years for each offence. A body corporate may receive a penalty of up to $255,000 (1,500 penalty units) per offence (sections 46 and 47 of the Act). Other penalties may apply, such as the interference offence provisions at Part 4.2 of the Act.

Richard Pascoe is a technology consultant & technology commentator for the media on FIVEaa , ABC Adelaide , PowerFM , 5MU , 7AD and 7BU and has been seen on the Channel 7 news , Channel 9 News , Channel 10 news and Today Tonight . Richard gives his opinions on Microsoft , Google , Apple and deals with personal computers , smartphones and tablets.

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